The Green Bank Formula For Finding Chukars

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Barb cam November 2013 042

Exobiologits are scientists who look for in intelligence in outer space.  They basically study things that are not even known to exist. How? Statistics. They use a formula which multiplies several strings of estimated numbers together.  It is called the Green Bank Formula and it is  used  to calculate the potential that something (intelligence, in whatever form) might exist.

So, perhaps any avid searcher for hard-to-find chukars, that seem to be in those outer limits,  could be called an exochukarologist.  At least it seems like a good title  for those of us looking for those little ufo-like fluffs of fast flying blurs  during lean population  years. Such are a few of my thoughts when on the prowl for birds that seem not to exist. . But unlike exobiologist who don’t know for sure if something exists, only the possibilities that it might, I have seen chukars before, so know that they do.

chukar oct 24, 2013 010

Part of my Green Bank Chukar Formula includes, type of terrain, vegetative condition, weather, birds counted, dropping they leave behind, sightings by others, and listening for sounds.  Like astronomers who beam radio waves into the heavens in hopes of getting a message back from some sort of interstellar intelligence, I cup my ears to the sky for signs  of more earthly sounds  intelligences closer to home.

Unlike intelligence in outer space, smart enough not to reveal themselves to earthlings who show questionable signs of intelligence, chukars are not advanced enough to know not to call out in the wilderness. So that is the first thing I do, before hitting any particular slope. Stand and listen at daylight. The first crack of dawn is too much for  a chukar  to resist at least a few calls to whatever it is they call for at that time of day. But they do, and that is all I care about. Revelation.

Though it is mid chukar season in my neck of the woods, and I am a bit behind in getting my search for them on, previous hunts have shown this to be a challenging year.  Finding chukars has been a bit like trying to find a ufo. Do they exist? Their tracks say yes. The results of my finding them, indicate otherwise.  It’s not easy being an exochukarologist.  Fortunately, I have a four legged secret weapon.

chukar oct 24, 2013 033

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Chukars Last Laugh

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Sugar Snow Chukar Jan 11, 2013 055

Inevitably it always does arrive, that fatal last day. The last day of any season, but in this case chukar season.  It is almost a love/hate affair. That is, I love to hunt chukars. But, towards the end of the season, after grueling climbs up the extreme slopes of the Salmon River canyon, it gets very difficult to push myself for yet another uphill battle.  A battle my heart and lungs take on with the landscape.

Wind River Ember Sugar Jan 20 2013 055

So with mixed emotions my last day with both dogs on the hill was more of the same. Good and bad. Hard, yet rewarding. Dogs not minding as well as think they should, yet making wonderful tandem points, and stupendously long retrieves when birds sail way too far down the slopes. You know, those slopes I keep complaining about. Ones that seem like 45 degrees, and at times really are. And those are the easier ones. Did I mention bony ridgelines, vertical cliffs, and a variety of ugliness that us chukar hunters often find ourselves engaged with?

Sugar, Ember, Barb, me, Jan 12, 2013 016

No wonder people who know nothing about chukar hunting think chukar hunters are so crazy. Heck, even chukar hunters wonder that sometimes.  But once fessing-up to knowing you are crazy means you don’t have to worry about it any more. Just keep pushing those birds, don’t look back, or more precisely down, in most cases. Focus. That is the name of the game.

Lake Ck Ember & Sugar Jan 16, 2013 081

My last day was a typical one, but favored the chukar, and they indeed seemed to get the last laugh. Like when a group came flying straight off the slopes high above, helter-skelter, and my swing, which was more of an  over-the-head-and-turn gymnastics  maneuver, was the perfect recipe for poor shooting success.  After the boom of gun and frustrations of watching birds untouched, I’m sure I could hear some chuckles of happy-to-be-alive birds entertained by my contorted antics on the hill.

Sugar Lucile Cave Hunt Jan 17, 2013 027

But, their entertainment is also mine.  Just seeing the type of flying they can do, like some kind of animated jet plane in a dog fight, is reward enough.  Although, I do sometimes luck out and manage to down one of those feathered Mig like fighters. Yet, a big part of chukar hunting is all of those ancillary shows that  always accompany the chase:  from large bucks, elk herds, fox trots,  coyote yipping, wolf tracks, bobcat scat, otter antics, and soaring eagles, to just mention a few.  And most remarkable is that all this theater takes place in a theater itself that is a good part of the outstanding entertainment.

Wind River Ember Sugar Jan 20 2013 072

(Whoa – Holy “chukar feathers” – how did we get so far up?)

Viewscapes afforded by one of the deepest gorges in North America are utterly breath-taking, yet considerably confounding.  So expansive and  rugged is the terrain, that its bigness makes one feel ever more so small.  A dwarf in the cosmos. It is a vastness of unfathomable comprehension that words never adequately can explain. So, rather, I just simply enjoy it and appreciate it for what it is. Though we humans like to share our pleasures with others, often it has to suffice just to appreciate those things that are truly unexplainable. To just “know” is enough.  Thank you chukars.  You are safe from my gun and nuisance of dogs for another year now. But, be forewarned: we will be back.

Wind River Ember Sugar Jan 20 2013 150

Lake Ck Ember & Sugar Jan 16, 2013 122

Sugar Snow Chukar Jan 11, 2013 044

Lake Ck Ember & Sugar Jan 16, 2013 152

What Do Chukars Think?

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Lake Ck Ember & Sugar Jan 16, 2013 060

Well, it is awfully tempting to dive into some imagined chukar   humor and wonder what kind of diatribe  they might use to poke fun at us hunter’s with.  As if they communicate like us humans do, which they don’t, but we like to anthropomorphize about, that is. Such are some of my thoughts  as I hunt along various terrains with not only my dogs, but my brain as well.  My mind contours the landscape with similar speed as my legs do. Sometimes I even get lost in this parallel world and forget that I am even hunting to begin with. At least until something triggers me back into reality, like  tripping on a loose rock, dog on point, or sudden burst of wings taking to the sky.

Lake Ck Ember & Sugar Jan 16, 2013 050

Also, in my self-talk,  I sometimes try to think like  a chukar in order to find them. But how can I do that, I’m a human, so I can only use human ideas.  It is difficult even trying to understand women sometimes, how would I ever begin to understand a chukar?  Telepathy is out. So is any chance at really communicating with any kind of animals, when us humans can barely communicate with each other.  Our astronomers think about what messages aliens might be sending out through space, yet learning what our own earth creatures have to tell us might be much more valuable.

Lucile Cave Jan 14, 2013 074

But, Earth to Gary, back to birds.  If chukars think, they must not think in words, but what kind of language to they use, if any?  I always wonder how their brains work.  For example: when serious snow hits the high country in an over night storm, but leaves the ground bare on the lower foothill sections, use patterns of chukars can change and adapt to the new situation.

Lake Ck Ember & Sugar Jan 16, 2013 152

So, from a chukars view-point, I wonder if they can see their landscape and differentiate which areas to change to for food and shelter.  Can they see bare ground amidst the snow, like wind-blown open ridges and draws, and make an effort to seek it out.  That is,  as opposed to just stumbling upon it, or never finding it to begin with.  For another example, if a major mountain side contains some snow free zones that can be seen from a far off distance, can chukars see this and fly over to it?  Do they think, hey there is a good place to find food and shelter? Or is that more like an instinct, or some kind of built in survival detector they just know to do?

Lake Ck Ember & Sugar Jan 16, 2013 018

I think about the same sorts of things about big game when I am hunting them. In what kind of ways to they use thought, if at all, about how they negotiate their terrain and survive the elements, including predation?  The natural  law of conservation of energy affects the survival abilities of all critters, but they don’t think about it, any more than us humans think about how gravity affects our movements all the time.

Lake Ck Ember & Sugar Jan 16, 2013 129

Thinking about predation could jeopardize survival, as opposed to acting without thinking about it first.  So immediate dangers that require fast reaction times are better left to the innate “fight or flight” responses for better success potential.

Lake Ck Ember & Sugar Jan 16, 2013 050

What about other abstract things, like a bird  learning about what happens when they fly  off a high  mountain to go all the way to the very bottom. Do they know how much more work will be required to climb back up to the top again?  Could this be any part of reasoning when a bird flies around the mountain so as not to lose too much in elevation, rather than sailing all the way to the bottom? Knowing it will be less energy draining and arduous, than leaving it up to chance alone.

Lake Ck Ember & Sugar Jan 16, 2013 073

What about late in the season when birds get up quicker and farther away from you when they see you coming, than they did earlier in the season? It would seem they have learned that distance is important for survival. It is almost is if they know the range of a shotgun. Or that humans require different strategies than other predators. They hunker down when golden eagles soar overhead, hold tight when dogs are on point, and jump into the air as soon as the two-legged hunters show up. How do they know? How abstract, if any at all, is some of their thought?

Sugar Lucile Cave Hunt Jan 17, 2013 017

As you can see, I may have been out on the chukar slopes a little too long. My thoughts, like my dog sometimes does when in hot pursuit, seems to be getting a little too close to  the edge. Those darned chukars. They can make some of us humans go crazy.  It’s probably just another chukar survival strategy.

Chukar Voodoo

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Ember Manning Br Jan 6, 2013 021

(Nope – no chukars in this picture)

Have you ever had one of those days, or dry spells, where chukars have seemed to evaporate from the landscape, never be to found within the time frame of your hunt?

Ember Chukar Bugle Basin Dec 31, 2012 072

These birds seem to  have some sort of secret power to put a hex on dogs and hunters.  Chukar Voodoo, I call it.  It helps describe all those days where everything works against you, but favors the chukars.  I can picture them dancing around in little bird rituals to help conjure up their secret spells. It includes special sacred adornments, like invisible shot proof plumage vests to ward off all pellets.  Not to mention, special invisible chukar paint that makes their bright colors disappear into surroundings that otherwise should reveal their stark contrast against it.  How can red hide against a yellowish  back ground, otherwise?

Ember Chukar Bugle Basin Dec 31, 2012 080

(Secret chukar spell cast over unsuspecting dogs)

It’s chukar voodoo, I tell you. They have access to powers unseen that help them play tricks on hunters and dogs. It  is a knowledge only birds possess, filled with ancient wisdom of the chukars from long ago.  These tricks of the trade and know-how for being a successful chukar enable them to pass on their  DNA to tomorrows progeny. It  is natures mechanism of control in the dynamic of all predator prey relationships. Ups and downs, help keep tedium and the boredom of sameness at bay.  The middle ground is safest, but all the excitement in the crucible of life takes place at the edges.

Ember Chukar Bugle Basin Dec 31, 2012 037

Voodoo Hoodoo, who likes it, I do.  It is all   part of the magic of dancing with the landscape, reading the language of nature, and enjoyment of the hunt and spirit of adventure. Amps, juice, spice, whatever you call it…all words to help describe our feelings of being surely alive. I love the chukars captivating magic.

Ember Chukar Bugle Basin Dec 31, 2012 084

Chukar Comedy Club

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Ember Chukar Bikini Jan 4, 2013 037

(see the chukar in this picture?)

There seems to be  an awful lot of things that can go wrong when hunting chukars which  can affect ones success rate. At least, mine, anyway.  Not to mention, much funnier to chukars and other hunters around a later campfire, than to me.   However, in self-defense, I spend as much time trying to get photos of dogs-on-point than focus on killing birds. So this often leads to a lot of missed opportunities to shoot, or less than ideal shots when taken anyway.  With camera in one hand and gun in other, then trying to put one down and the other up, before birds are too far out,  often turns into a huge comedy of errors.

Ember Chukar Bikini Jan 4, 2013 005

(see it now?)

One day I managed to climb over a rise and was treated to seeing my dog on point with birds in sight just a few yards ahead of her. About 8 birds were grouped together within inches of each other, looking like prairie dogs curious about an intruder. Normally, I would go for my camera first, but this time they looked like they were about to burst into the air at any moment.  My second thought was about how hard I had been hunting for the last 5 days in a row, and not a lot of birds to show for. With a chance to get a few birds with one shot, ground sluicing entered my mind. I knew that it is always risky and not usually very productive, but this looked just too good to miss.  But miss I did. When the dust settled after my one ground shot, not a feather was ruffled.  It was if my shell had no pellets in it at all. Greed has grave consequences.

I vowed then and there, never to ground sluice a chukar ever again.  Next time, I would wait until they jumped into the air before shooting. My chance came the very next day. Sure enough, I saw the birds in front of my dog on point. (which is not always easy to see). This time I pressed closer to get them to flush. Click. I expected to hear BANG.  Nope.  In my haste at grabbing gear from my driftboat before heading up the slopes,  I had forgotten to load my gun.

Then another time, I was high on the hill (ok, second deepest chasm in North America) at hard-earned elevations to reach to begin with, and what do I hear when I raise my gun and fire? Click.  That sickening sound again, or lack there-of, indicating yet another brain synapse mis-fire.  My excuse? Well, after I shoot at birds, I normally look for spent shells right away. Spent shell case liter on the  hillside is not a history I wish to leave behind. But,  sometimes that means picking them up before loading my gun again. Then I forget to load it, thinking I already did.   I hate it when my brain works (or doesn’t) like that.

Or how about poor footage on steep ground, unable to get off shots because in your shock and engagement with tricky terrain turns into a balance act of trying to save yourself from face-plants on the hillside. Though sometimes face-plants result anyway. Has your shotgun ever went flying through the air in an effort to save yourself from starting a self-imposed human  avalanche down the steep slopes? This is why I don’t use a fancy shotgun.  Simple, ugly, fine with me. No worries when I do dumbly and stumbley on the mountain.

Ember Chukar Bikini Jan 4, 2013 047

(  “I think their up their in the snow zone”  )

Real chukar hunters know how many things can go wrong during the pursuit. Birds jump up when you think the dog is only on past scent, after you have done everything to flush birds and are convinced none are there. Then there are those  other areas on open ground, where it should be easy to see birds, but none are seen, until poof; they suddenly appear in mid-air as if jumping out of a magician’s hat. It’s hard to shoot when your pants are down around your ankles, sort of speaking.

Ember Chukar Bikini Jan 4, 2013 063

( Now that we are up here, I think they are down there.” )

How many times have you finished a hard hunt, after failing to find birds in birdy looking area,  to have them call (really, it sounds more like laughing) loudly to you from where you had just been? Chukars usually do get the last laugh.

Last Day of the Season

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Jan 31, 2012 was the a last day of chukar season.  My body welcomes the rest from an arduous and long endeavor of such winged pursuit. Following is what helped make my last day so rewarding.

 

Thanks Girls

Chukar University Field Work

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Ember: “Hey Sugar, do you see any chukars up here?” Sugar: “No, I think that fall, two draws back, when our master-guide hit the ground as his shotgun flew through the air, must have thrown his thinking off.”

Sugar: : “Hey Ember, I think I got some chukar dust in my ear, did he say we had to go up again?”

Sugar: ” Ember, don’t look now, but do you see those two elk behind me?”

Sugar:  “Ember, do you remember reading that chapter in our chukar book about what it means when you see more elk than chukars?”

Ember: ” Ya, I think it said that when  elk are found bedded down in the high country, it is time to get a book on psychology for your master-guide, because he might not  know up from down.”

Ember: ” I’m starting to get a fear of heights. Sugar, whadda think about  getting ourselves down off from here?”

Old guides axiom: When big rivers look small, it means you are too high up and  have entered the oxygen deprivation zone.

Warning:  Hunting chukars in this zone can cause delusions of grandeur.

Rivers make good medicine with us, we make good medicine with rivers.
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